Economics of Antitrust: Complex Issues In a Dynamic Economy

Thu May 31 16:24:38 EDT 2007
Edited by Dr. Lawrence Wu

Economics of Antitrust: Complex Issues In a Dynamic Economy is a provocative look at the complex issues surrounding modern antitrust analysis and the economic methods that are used to address important and challenging questions in competition policy. Edited by economist Dr. Lawrence Wu, the book examines a broad range of hotly-contested issues in three key areas of competition policy: anticompetitive foreclosure and exclusionary conduct, mergers and acquisitions, and antitrust liability and damages.


To order a copy of Economics of Antitrust: Complex Issues In a Dynamic Economy ($29.95 USD) or to request a chapter, please visit http://www.economicsofantitrust.com/book2/preview.htm.


The second book in NERA's Economics of Antitrust series, Economics of Antitrust: Complex Issues in a Dynamic Economy is a compilation of articles and case studies complementing the fundamental issues that were covered in the previous volume, Economics of Antitrust: New Issues, Questions, and Insights. The chapters in Economics of Antitrust: Complex Issues in a Dynamic Economy illustrate the complexity of modern antitrust analysis, using practical examples and case studies from a variety of industries, including telecommunications and pharmaceuticals.  

  • The Economics of Refusals to Deal 
  • Anticompetitive Price Squeezes in the Telecommunications Industry: A Common Complaint about Common Facilities 
  • Schering-Plough and the Antitrust Analysis of Patent Settlement Agreements in Pharmaceutical Markets
  • Assessing the Merits of Early Termination Fees 
  • Minding Your Ps and Qs: Moving Beyond Conventional Theory to Capture the Non-Price 
  • Designing and Using Surveys to Define Relevant Markets 
  • Ownership and Control: Implications for the Analysis of Interlocking Directorates, Partial Equity Ownership Acquisitions, and Joint Ventures 
  • Competition Policy Analysis in Dynamic and Complex Markets: Switching Costs, Aftermarkets, and Network Effects 
  • Observations on the Multiple Dimensions of Market Power
  • Proving Causation in Damages Analyses 
  • Do Not-For-Profit Firms Behave Differently? 
  • Monopoly Overcharges, Pass-Through Pricing, and Economic Damages